Power Amp Buying Guide

Matching Amps to Speakers

Damping Factor Demystified

It’s all in the Ohms

Slew Rate, Does It Really Matter?

 

No matter whether you are an avid musician, music student or a sound engineer, it is very difficult to buying power amplifiers. Because there are lots of power amplifiers available in the market. Now a day, there are numbers of online stores, who offers wide range of power amps.

Power amps are is the device, which enhances the quality of the sound. Basically it consumes the original audio signals and boosts them up. So, while you are going to purchase a power amp, make sure that – you’ve got the perfect product, because a poor quality power amp can negative effect on the sound quality.

In short, correct amount of power and exclusive and advanced features can only provide you the right power amp for you PA system.

Matching Amps to Speakers

While you are going to match a power amp to a PA speaker, the golden rule is – find a amplifier that can deliver the power which equal to double the speaker’s continuous IEC power rating.

In short, a speaker with a nominal impedance of 8 ohms along with 350 watts of continuous IEC power ratings will need an amp, which can generate 700 watt into an 8-ohm load. Additionally, there are numbers of professional amps are designed with extra headroom.

Finally, it is advisable that, if you are restricted due to your low budget or your existing legacy equipment – very careful before selecting any product. Otherwise, surprisingly you can see, how low voltage can damage your speakers or entire system.

 

Damping Factor Demystified

Usually, speakers produce their own sounds. In other words, it twist the original sound, it keep vibrating even after the signals are stopped. It is commonly known as – "ringing" or "time smearing". In short – speakers produces the sound, which is not the part of the original sound.

For example, if the signal is a heavy drum stroke, when the drum signal stops, the speakers continue vibrating. The code ups and down in its suspension. Now the question is, how it works? Well, when the loudspeaker cone vibrates, it behaves like a microphone and generating a signal. This signal is called EMF (back Electro Motive Force). It creates currents and which traveled across the speaker cables back into the amp output. Back EMF is in opposite polarity of the speaker’s motion.

It’s all in the Ohms

Ohms are measure of resistance. Usually, audio amps designed to work with 4,8 and 16 ohms. Where as, the optimum system performance can be obtained if the total resistive load of the loudspeaker. If the total loudspeaker resistive load is high, then power delivered to the loudspeakers will be reduced. On the other hand, if the loudspeaker resistive load is low, the power will be increased, which can overload or damage the amplifier.

 

Slew Rate, Does It Really Matter?

Slew rate is a measure to determine the amplifier’s ability to follow it’s input signal. This unit measure voltage in microseconds. This term used to define the maximum rate of change of an amp’s output voltage with relevance to its input voltage. Many power amps play very vital role in music or overall sound. The different specifications like gaining, inputting noise and many more….

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